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Best Case Ever 38 Sickle Cell Acute Chest Syndrome

Sickle Cell Acute Chest Syndrome remains the leading cause of death in patients suffering from Sickle Cell Disease. In his Best Case Ever, Dr. Richard Ward, a hematologist with a special interest in Sickle Cell Disease, describes a case of a Sickle Cell Disease patient who presents with what appears to be a simple pain crisis, but turns out to be a devastating Acute Chest Syndrome. He gives us the key clinical pearls and pitfalls to make this often elusive diagnosis early so that life-saving treatment can be initiated in a timely manner. This is in anticipation of the upcoming episode on The Emergency Management of Sickle Cell Pain Crisis with Dr. Ward and Dr. John Foote.

By |2017-02-03T11:50:38+00:00August 11th, 2015|Categories: Best Case Ever, Hematology|Tags: , , |0 Comments

BCE 72 Overinvestigation in Emergency Medicine

With increased access to timely advanced diagnostic testing in ED rational resource utilization is becoming ever more important. In his Best Case Ever Dr. Shabhaz Syed argues that a patient at Janus General who presented to the ED with chest pain, died as a result of overinvestigation, and explains how understanding the factors that contribute to overinvestigation, Baysian theory, diagnostic decision analysis, radiation risk, and teaching "dogma" may help prevent overinvestigation in Emergency Medicine...

Episode 82 – Emergency Radiology Controversies

EM Cases Episode 82 Emergency Radiology Controversies, pearls and pitfalls: Which patients with chest pain suspected of ACS require a CXR? What CXR findings do ED docs tend to miss? How should we workup solitary pulmonary nodules found on CXR or CT? Is the abdominal x-ray dead or are there still indications for it's use? Which x-ray views are preferred for detecting pneumoperitoneum? When should we consider ultrasound as a screening test instead of, or before, CT? What are the indications for contrast in abdominal and head CT? How should we manage the patient who has had a previous CT contrast reaction who really needs a CT with contrast? What is the truth about CT radiation for shared decision making? And much more...

Episode 64 Highlights from Whistler’s Update in EM Conference 2015 Part 2

In this Part 2 of EM Cases' Highlights from Whistler's Update in EM Conference 2015 Dr. David Carr gives you his top 5 pearls and pitfalls on ED antibiotic use including when patients with sinusitis really require antibiotics, when oral antibiotics can replace IV antibiotics, how we should be dosing Vancomycin in the ED, the newest antibiotic regimens for gonorrhea and the mortality benefit associated with antibiotic use in patients with upper GI bleeds. Dr. Chris Hicks gives you his take on immediate PCI in post-cardiac arrest patients with a presumed cardiac cause and The Modified HEART Score to safely discharge patients with low risk chest pain.

Episode 15 Part 2: Acute Coronary Syndromes Management

In Part 2 of this Episode on Acute Coronary Syndromes Risk Stratification & Management, the evidence for various medications for ACS, from supplemental oxygen to thrombolytics are debated, and decision making around reperfusion therapy for STEMI as well as NSTEMI are discussed. Finally, there is a discussion on risk stratification of low risk chest pain patients and all it's attendant challenges as well as disposition and follow-up decisions. Dr. Eric Letovsky, the Head of the CCFP(EM) Program at the University of Toronto, Dr. Mark Mensour & Dr. Neil Fam, an interventional cardiologist answer questions like: What is the danger of high flow oxygen in the setting of ACS? When, if ever, should we be using IV B-blockers in AMI patients? How can you predict, in the ED, who might go on to have an urgent CABG, in which case Clopidogrel is contra-indicated? Which anticoagulant is best for unstable angina, NSTEMI and STEMI - unfractionated heparin (UFH), low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), or fonduparinux? Is there currenly any role for Glycoprotein 2b3a Inhibitors in ACS in the ED? When is thrombolysis better than PCI for STEMI? When should we consider facilitated angioplasty and rescue angioplasty? Which low risk chest pain patients require an early stress test? CT coronary angiography? Stress Echo? Admission to a Coronary Decision Unit (CDU)? and many more.......

Episode 15 Part 1: Acute Coronary Syndromes Risk Stratification

In Part 1 of this Episode on Acute Coronary Syndromes Risk Stratification Dr. Eric Letovksy, Dr. Mark Mensour and Dr. Neil Fam discuss common pearls and pitfalls in assessing the patient who presents to the ED with chest pain. They review atypical presentations to look out for, what the literature says about the value of traditional and non-traditional cardiac risk factors, the diagnostic utility of recent cardiac testing, and which patients in the ED should have a cardiac work-up. Finally, in the ED work up of Acute Coronary Syndromes Risk Stratification, they highlight some valuable key points in ECG interpretation and how best to use and interpret cardiac biomarkers like troponin. Drs. Letovksy, Mensour & Fam address questions like: How useful are the traditional cardiac risk factors in predicting ACS in the ED? How does a negative recent treadmill stress test, nuclear stress test or angiogram effect the pre-test probability of ACS in the ED? What does recent evidence tell us about the assumption that patients presenting with chest pain and a presumed new LBBB will rule in for MI and require re-perfusion therapy? How can we diagnose MI in the patient with a ventricular pacemaker? What is the difference between Troponin I and Troponin T from a practical clinical perspective? Is one Troponin ever good enough to rule out MI in the patient with a normal ECG? Should we be using a 2hr delta troponin protocol? How will the new ultra-sensitive Troponins change our practice? and many more.....

Best Case Ever 4 Acute Coronary Syndrome From Venous Source

In anticipation of Episode 15, 'Acute Coronary Syndromes' with Dr. Eric Letovsky, Dr. Mark Mensour and Dr. Neil Fam, we present here, Dr. Helman's 'Best Case Ever' of an ACS patient. In Episode 15: 'Acute Coronary Syndromes', Drs. Fam, Mensour , Letovsky and Helman discuss questions like: How does a recent negative stress test or angiogram effect the pre-test probability of ACS in the ED? What does recent evidence tell us about the assumption that patients presenting with chest pain and a presumed new LBBB will rule in for MI and require reperfusion therapy? [wpfilebase tag=file id=376 tpl=emc-play /] [wpfilebase tag=file id=377 tpl=emc-mp3 /]

By |2016-10-20T13:26:08+00:00June 5th, 2011|Categories: Best Case Ever, Cardiology, EM Cases, Emergency Medicine|Tags: , , , , |0 Comments

Episode 7: Medical and Surgical Emergencies in Pregnancy

The whole playing field changes with pregnant patients in the emergency department. When you're faced with one of the Medical and Surgical Emergencies in Pregnancy that we'll cover in this episode, there are added challenges and considerations. Dr. Shirley Lee and Dr. Dominick Shelton discuss a challenging case of a pregnant patient presenting to the emergency department with shortness of breath and chest pain. They review those diagnoses that the pregnant patient is at risk for and discuss the challenges of lab test interpretation and imaging algorithms in the pregnant patient. Next, they walk us through the management of cardiac arrest in the pregnant patient. In another case of a pregnant patient who presents with abdominal pain and fever, they discuss strategies to minimize delays in diagnosis to prevent serious morbidity and mortality. The pros and cons of abdominal ultrasound, CT and MRI are reviewed as well as the management of appendicitis, pyelonephritis and septic abortion in pregnant patients.

WTBS 16 Listening for the QI Signal in the Noise of ED Return Visits: Focus on Missed MI

Jesse McLaren outlines 10 Quality Improvement (QI) opportunities for reducing missed AMIs and the lessons learned from Ontario’s Emergency Department Return Visit Quality Program in this Waiting to Be Seen blog...

Ep 114 Pulmonary Embolism Challenges in Diagnosis 2 – Imaging, Pregnancy, Subsegmental PE

In Part 1 of Pulmonary Embolism Challenges in Diagnosis Drs. Helman, Lang and DeWit discussed a workup algorithm using PERC and Wells score, the bleeding risk of treated pulmonary embolism, pearls in decision making on whether or not to work up a patient for pulmonary embolism, how risk factors contribute to pretest probability, the YEARS criteria and age-adjusted D-dimer. In this Part 2 we answer questions such as: what are the important test characteristics of CTPA we need to understand? Which patients with subsegmental pulmonary embolism should we treat? When should we consider VQ SPECT? What is the best algorithm for the work up of pulmonary embolism in pregnant patients? How best should we implement pulmonary embolism diagnostic decision tools in your ED? and many more…