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Episode 15 Part 2: Acute Coronary Syndromes Management

In Part 2 of this Episode on Acute Coronary Syndromes Risk Stratification & Management, the evidence for various medications for ACS, from supplemental oxygen to thrombolytics are debated, and decision making around reperfusion therapy for STEMI as well as NSTEMI are discussed. Finally, there is a discussion on risk stratification of low risk chest pain patients and all it's attendant challenges as well as disposition and follow-up decisions. Dr. Eric Letovsky, the Head of the CCFP(EM) Program at the University of Toronto, Dr. Mark Mensour & Dr. Neil Fam, an interventional cardiologist answer questions like: What is the danger of high flow oxygen in the setting of ACS? When, if ever, should we be using IV B-blockers in AMI patients? How can you predict, in the ED, who might go on to have an urgent CABG, in which case Clopidogrel is contra-indicated? Which anticoagulant is best for unstable angina, NSTEMI and STEMI - unfractionated heparin (UFH), low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), or fonduparinux? Is there currenly any role for Glycoprotein 2b3a Inhibitors in ACS in the ED? When is thrombolysis better than PCI for STEMI? When should we consider facilitated angioplasty and rescue angioplasty? Which low risk chest pain patients require an early stress test? CT coronary angiography? Stress Echo? Admission to a Coronary Decision Unit (CDU)? and many more.......

Episode 15 Part 1: Acute Coronary Syndromes Risk Stratification

In Part 1 of this Episode on Acute Coronary Syndromes Risk Stratification Dr. Eric Letovksy, Dr. Mark Mensour and Dr. Neil Fam discuss common pearls and pitfalls in assessing the patient who presents to the ED with chest pain. They review atypical presentations to look out for, what the literature says about the value of traditional and non-traditional cardiac risk factors, the diagnostic utility of recent cardiac testing, and which patients in the ED should have a cardiac work-up. Finally, in the ED work up of Acute Coronary Syndromes Risk Stratification, they highlight some valuable key points in ECG interpretation and how best to use and interpret cardiac biomarkers like troponin. Drs. Letovksy, Mensour & Fam address questions like: How useful are the traditional cardiac risk factors in predicting ACS in the ED? How does a negative recent treadmill stress test, nuclear stress test or angiogram effect the pre-test probability of ACS in the ED? What does recent evidence tell us about the assumption that patients presenting with chest pain and a presumed new LBBB will rule in for MI and require re-perfusion therapy? How can we diagnose MI in the patient with a ventricular pacemaker? What is the difference between Troponin I and Troponin T from a practical clinical perspective? Is one Troponin ever good enough to rule out MI in the patient with a normal ECG? Should we be using a 2hr delta troponin protocol? How will the new ultra-sensitive Troponins change our practice? and many more.....

Best Case Ever 4 Acute Coronary Syndrome From Venous Source

In anticipation of Episode 15, 'Acute Coronary Syndromes' with Dr. Eric Letovsky, Dr. Mark Mensour and Dr. Neil Fam, we present here, Dr. Helman's 'Best Case Ever' of an ACS patient. In Episode 15: 'Acute Coronary Syndromes', Drs. Fam, Mensour , Letovsky and Helman discuss questions like: How does a recent negative stress test or angiogram effect the pre-test probability of ACS in the ED? What does recent evidence tell us about the assumption that patients presenting with chest pain and a presumed new LBBB will rule in for MI and require reperfusion therapy? [wpfilebase tag=file id=376 tpl=emc-play /] [wpfilebase tag=file id=377 tpl=emc-mp3 /]

By |2016-10-20T13:26:08-04:00June 5th, 2011|Categories: Best Case Ever, Cardiology, EM Cases, Emergency Medicine|Tags: , , , , |0 Comments

Episode 7: Medical and Surgical Emergencies in Pregnancy

The whole playing field changes with pregnant patients in the emergency department. When you're faced with one of the Medical and Surgical Emergencies in Pregnancy that we'll cover in this episode, there are added challenges and considerations. Dr. Shirley Lee and Dr. Dominick Shelton discuss a challenging case of a pregnant patient presenting to the emergency department with shortness of breath and chest pain. They review those diagnoses that the pregnant patient is at risk for and discuss the challenges of lab test interpretation and imaging algorithms in the pregnant patient. Next, they walk us through the management of cardiac arrest in the pregnant patient. In another case of a pregnant patient who presents with abdominal pain and fever, they discuss strategies to minimize delays in diagnosis to prevent serious morbidity and mortality. The pros and cons of abdominal ultrasound, CT and MRI are reviewed as well as the management of appendicitis, pyelonephritis and septic abortion in pregnant patients.

EM Quick Hits 33 Polytrauma Tips & Tricks, Toxic Megacolon, ECG in PE, Patch Calls, CT Before LP, Nebulized Ketamine

In this month's EM Quick Hits podcast, Anand Swaminathan on tips and tricks in polytrauma, Rohit Mohindra on diagnosis and management of toxic megacolon, Jesse McLaren on ECG in pulmonary embolism, Victoria Myers on approach to the patch call for cardiac arrest, Brit Long on when to do a CT head before LP, Salim Rezaie on nebulized ketamine - the ketaBAN study...

ECG Cases 26: Pulmonary Embolism and Acute RV Strain

In this month's ECG Cases Dr. Jesse McLaren runs through 10 cases and explains how the ECG can be integral in the diagnosis and management of pulmonary embolism, even though it is not incorporated into any of the commonly used decision tools for diagnosis of pulmonary embolism...

ECG Cases 25: ‘Late STEMI’ – How acute is the coronary occlusion?

In this ECG Cases blog we look at 10 patients with potentially ischemic symptoms. Which had a coronary occlusion, and how acute were they? Jesse McLaren explains 'Late STEMI' and how reperfusion strategies should not be based on time of symptom onset...

ECG Cases 24 Reciprocal Change and Occlusion MI

Dr. Jesse MacLaren reviews 10 ECG cases highlighting how reciprocal change can be secondary to LBBB/LVH, primary changes, or both, how it can be the first and remain the dominant sign of occlusion, pointing to subtle ST elevation or hyperacute T waves, how it can can highlight subtle inferior, lateral or proximal LAD occlusions, how it can be the only sign of posterior OMI; and how it can be absent in mid-distal LAD occlusion...

ECG Cases 23 – Wellens syndrome, reperfusion and reocclusion MI

Eight patients presented with potentially ischemic symptoms and T-wave inversions. Which had occlusion MI, which were reperfused and which were reoccluded? Jesse McLaren helps you discover the nuances of Wellens syndrome and T-wave inversions on this month's ECG Cases blog...

By |2021-07-13T12:27:47-04:00July 13th, 2021|Categories: Cardiology, ECG Cases, Emergency Medicine, Medical Specialty|Tags: , , , |0 Comments

ECG Cases 22: T-wave INVERSION mnemonic

The differential for T-wave INVERSION includes: Incorrect lead placement, No bundle (RBBB, LBBB), Ventricular hypertrophy (LVH, RVH), Embolism, Reciprocal/refractory/reperfused occlusion MI, Sudden death (ARVD), Iatrogenic (digoxin), Obtunded (eg SAH), and Normal variant. Jesse McLaren runs through 10 cases of patients who present to the ED who have T-wave inversions on their ECGs...

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