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ECG Cases 33 Brugada Syndrome: 3-Step Approach to Diagnosis and Management

Jesse McLaren guides us through 7 cases and explains his 3-step approach to diagnosing and managing Brugada syndrome in this month's ECG Cases blog...

EMC Cases Summaries

The EM Cases Summaries are succinct, written, easily navigable, key point reports of each main episode podcast, authored by Our Team that you can download to your smartphone or tablet to reference and read at the bedside or at your leisure automatic download via dropbox. Download individual pdf EM Cases Summaries by clicking on the category and then episode title below Episode 195 Management of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage with Katie Lin & Jeff Perry Episode 194 Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Recognition, Workup, Diagnosis with Jeff Perry & Katie Lin Episode 193 Life Threatening Asthma with Leeor Sommer & Sameer Mal Episode 192 Asthma Management - 5 Step Approach with Leeor Sommer & Sameer Mal Episode 191 Future of EM - Systems Thinking with Alecs Chochinov & David Petrie Episode 190 Carpal Bone Injuries with Arun Sayal & Matt Distefano Episode 189 Wrist Injuries with Arun Sayal & Matt Distefano Episode 188 Hemoptysis with Bourke Tillmann & Scott Weingart Episode 187 Crashing Analphylaxis & AMAX4 Algorithm with Ben McKenzie Episode 186 Traumatic Dental Emergencies with Chris Nash & Richard Ngo Episode 185 Atraumatic Dental Emergencies with Chris Nash & Richard Ngo Episode 184 Drug Interactions with David Juurlink [...]

By |2024-05-28T16:51:40-04:00July 12th, 2022|Comments Off on EMC Cases Summaries

EM Quick Hits 35 – 10 Best Papers of 2021, Peripartum Cardiomyopathy, Crashing Asthmatic, Febrile Neutropenia, Anaphylaxis update

In this months EM Quick Hits podcast: Ken Milne expertly walks us through the 10 biggest EM papers of 2021, Brit Long on a careful structured approach to Febrile Neutropenia to improve outcomes, Catherine Varner on how not to miss Peripartum Cardiomyopathy, Joe Nemeth on Anaphylaxis update and Anand Swaminathan gives us his approach to the Crashing Asthmatic...

EM Cases Top 13 Best of All Time 10th Anniversary Celebration

Based on a blend of the number of podcast downloads, webpage views, social media engagement, number of positive emails and comments that I received, and my own favs, I’m pleased to bring you the EM Cases Best of All Time 10th Year Anniversary Edition...

By |2020-12-31T16:46:25-05:00December 29th, 2020|Categories: EM Cases, Emergency Medicine, Medical Specialty, News|Tags: , |4 Comments

EM Quick Hits 17 Adrenal Crisis, Strep Throat, Posterior MI, DKA Just the Facts, Ovarian Torsion Imaging, HINTS Exam, Canadian CT Head Rule

Anand Swaminathan on recognition and ED management of adrenal crisis, Maria Ivankovic on indications for antibiotics in strep throat from EM Cases Course 2020, Jesse McLaren on recognition of posterior MI from ECG Cases, Justin Yan & Hans Rosenberg on just the facts of approach to DKA, Brit Long on ovarian torsion imaging myths, Walter Himmel on how to use the HINTS exam properly, and Ian Stiell on how to use Canadian CT head rules properly...

Ep 133 Emergency Management of Status Epilepticus

Among the presentations seen in the ED, few command the same respect as status epilepticus. It is, in itself, both a diagnostic dilemma and, at times, a therapeutic nightmare. There’s a reason it’s the very first domino to fall in the dreaded sequence “seizure, coma, death”. Status epilepticus can be nuanced to manage. Sure, most seizures self-abort or love an IV dose of lorazepam, but ask anyone who’s been down the propofol route, and they’re not likely to have forgotten the time they stared down a patient who just...would...not....stop...

Ep 132 Emergency Approach to Resolved Seizures

What is the essential list of immediate life threats with specific antidotes that we must know for the ED patient with a seizure? What are the key elements for distinguishing a true seizure from syncope? From Psychogenic Non-Epileptic Seizure (PNES)? From TIA? From migraine? How do you distinguish Todd's Paralysis from TIA or stroke? What are indications for lactate and troponins in patients who present with a seizure? Do all patients with first time unprovoked seizures require anti-seizure medication in the ED? What is the preferred anti-seizure medication and route for ED loading for the patient with a first time seizure? Which patients who present with seizure require a CT head in the ED? What are indications and ideal timing for EEG for patient who present to the ED with seizure? and many more...

EM Quick Hits 7 Approach to Status Epilepticus, Codeine Interactions, Anticoagulation in Malignancy, Atrial Fibrillation Rate vs Rhythm Control, Peripheral Vasopressors, Motivational Interviewing

Anand Swaminathan on a simple approach to status epilepticus, David Juurlink on codeine and tramadol interactions: nasty drugs with nastier drug interactions, Brit Long on DOACS in patients with malignancy: which patient's with cancer can be safely prescribed DOACs? Ian Stiell on atrial fibrillation rate vs rhythm control controversy, Justin Morgenstern on peripheral vasopressors: safe or unsafe? Michelle Klaiman, Taryn Lloyd on motivational interviewing that makes a difference to patient's lives...

Ep 126 EM Drugs That Work and Drugs That Don’t – Part 1: Analgesics

In this podcast we discuss the key concepts in assessing drug efficacy trials, and provide you with a bottom line recommendation for the use of gabapentinoids, NSAIDs and acetaminophen for low back pain and radicular symptoms, topical NSAIDs and cyclobenzaprine for sprains and strains, caffeine as an adjunct analgesic, why we should never prescribe tramadol, dexamethasone for pharyngitis, calcium channel blockers for hemorrhoids and anal fissures, buscopan for abdominal pain and renal colic and why morphine might be a better analgesic choice than hydromorphone...

Episode 86 – Emergency Management of Hyperkalemia

This is 'A Nuanced Approach to Emergency Management of Hyperkalemia' on EM Cases. Of all the electrolyte emergencies, hyperkalemia is the one that has the greatest potential to lead to cardiac arrest. And so, early in my EM training I learned to get the patient on a monitor, ensure IV access, order up an ECG, bombard the patient with a cocktail of kayexalate, calcium, insulin, B-agonists, bicarb, fluids and furosemide, and get the patient admitted, maybe with some dialysis to boot. Little did I know that some of these therapies were based on theory alone while others were based on a few small poorly done studies. It turns out that some of these therapies may cause more harm than good, and that precisely when and how to give these therapies to optimize patient outcomes is still not really known...

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