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Ep 165 Getting Sued in Emergency Medicine – Practical Tips

How many civil actions against Emergency Physicians does CMPA handle and what have been the outcomes? What are the 4 aspects of medical negligence and the anatomy of a legal action against physicians in Canada? What are the 3 stages of civil action in a medicolegal law suit in Canada? How should you respond when you are served with a medicolegal action? How can you minimize the stress associated with getting sued? What is the role of expert evidence in medical negligence actions? What strategies can we use to lower the risk of getting sued for medical negligence based on CMPA data and ED chiefs' opinions...

BCE 63 Failing Up after Medical Error

Dr. Sarah Gray tells us the story of her worst case ever and what she learned from it. About 50% of North American physicians involved in a serious medical error report increased anxiety for future errors, decreased confidence in their job, decreased job satisfaction, insomnia, PTSD, panic disorder – the list goes on. Dr. Gray shares how and why many of us react to medical error - the embarrassment, the shame, the guilt and sense of failure. She then explains the notion of acceptance that we all fail, that perfection is a myth, and how she learned that "failing up" after of the most difficult case of her career is the best choice after making a medical error...

Episode 11: Cognitive Decision Making and Medical Error

In this episode on Cognitive Decision Making & Medical Error, Dr. Doug Sinclair, CMO of St. Michael's Hospital and Dr. Chris Hicks show us that, while the ED physician's knowledge base may play a small part in predicting medical error, more important might be how we understand and reflect upon our decision-making processes, how we communicate with our staff and patients, and how we cope with the ED environment and shift work. Medical error is the 6th leading cause of death in North America, and despite huge advances in imaging technology and lab testing as well as an explosion of EM literature in recent years, the misdiagnosis rate detected through autopsy studies has not changed significantly over the past century. Studies on diagnostic error in emergency medicine have shown error rates between 1 and 12%, and it's been suggested that cognitive error, or some flaw in the decision making process (as apposed to a lack of knowledge), is present in about 95% of these cases. Dr. Sinclair and Dr. Hicks elucidate for us how to identify and understand cognitive decision making and medical error, and how we can improve our decision making, reduce medical error and optimize the care of our patients.

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