About Anton Helman

Dr. Anton Helman is an Emergency Physician at North York General in Toronto. He is an Assistant Professor at the University of Toronto, Division of Emergency Medicine and the Education Innovation Lead at the Schwartz-Reisman Emergency Medicine Instititute. He is the founder, editor-in-chief and host of Emergency Medicine Cases.

EM Quick Hits 28 Cardiogenic Shock, Radiation Dose in Pregnancy, PoCUS in Airway Management, VIPIT, Angiotensin II, Short-Term Steroid Safety

In this month's EM Quick Hits podcast: Anand Swaminathan on the approach to cardiogenic shock, Hania Bielawska on the myths of radiation dose in pregnant patients, Hans Rosenberg & Michael Gottlieb on PoCUS in airway management, Menaka Pai on VIPIT following AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccination, Brit Long & Michael Gottlieb on Angiotensin II for emergency clinicians, Michael Schull on tips on the safety of short-term steroid use....

Glenohumeral Dislocation Rapid Review Video

New Rapid Review video to refresh your memory on podcast episode 135 Commonly Missed or Mismanaged Shoulder Injuries with Arun Sayal and Dale Dantzer – Approach and Glenohumeral Dislocations. Subtle findings of posterior shoulder dislocation, shoulder x-ray considerations and nuances in shoulder dislocation reduction....

Ep 155 Treatment of Bradycardia and Bradydysrhythmias

In Part 1 of our 2-part series on bradycardia and bradydysrhythmias we discussed a practical approach with electrophysiologist Paul Dorian and EM doc Tarlan Hedayati. In this, part 2, we discuss details of treatment. We answer questions such as: When should pacing be prioritized over medications and vice versa? What are the latest recommendations about dosing of atropine and when is atropine likely to be detrimental? How is the treatment of bradycardia different in the patient with hypothermia? Cardiac ischemia? Myxedema coma? AV nodal blocker overdose? What are the most common pitfalls in utilizing transcutaneous and transvenous pacing? and many more...

Ep 154: 4-Step Approach to Bradycardia and Bradydysrhythmias

How do we figure out when bradycardia is due to a medical illness and when it is a primary cardiac problem? What are the 4 immediate life threatening diagnosis that we have to entertain and address in the first few minutes of the sick bradycardic patients? What are some key ECG patterns that are sometimes missed by ED docs that can have devastating consequences? How can we better understand Torsades de Pointes by understanding AV blocks? How can we better understand Mobitz l and ll using 'The Dorian' approach? What is BRASH syndrome and how can we recognize it? In this main episode podcast 4-step Approach to Bradycardia and Bradydysrhythmias with electrophysiologist, educator and researcher Dr. Paul Dorian and Chair of Education for the ED at Cook County Hospital Dr. Tarlan Hedayati, we dig deep into bradycardia...

EM Quick Hits 27 Colchicine for COVID, Bicarb in Cardiac Arrest, Troponin in CKD, GHB Withdrawal, Iloprost for Frostbite, Patient Complaints

In this month's EM Quick Hits podcast: Justin Morgenstern on colchicine for COVID pneumonia, Victoria Myers on sodium bicarbonate in cardiac arrest, Brit Long on troponin in chronic kidney disease, Michelle Klaiman on GHB overdose, Ian Walker on iloprost for frostbite, Sarah Reid on tips on avoiding patient and parent complaints....

Ep 153 Pediatric Minor Head Injury and Concussion

Recent literature suggests that pediatric patients take longer to recover from mild traumatic brain injury compared to adults, and persistent post-concussive symptoms (PPCS) after 1 month occur in up to 30% of children after minor head injury. These children can and should be identified in the ED based on the PPCS clinical risk score. In this EM Cases main episode podcast "Pediatric Minor Head Injury and Concussion" Dr. Sarah Reid and Dr. Roger Zemek discuss how best to incorporate the PECARN and CRASH2 decision tools into your practice, the role of Fast MRI, how to identify children who are at risk for long term sequelae after a minor head injury and how to manage persistent concussion symptoms when a child returns to the ED after a minor head injury...

POCUS Cases 10 Limitations, Pitfalls and Accuracy of POCUS for Ruptured AAA

Dr. Rob Simard discusses one of the most important uses of POCUS in the ED, and that is for AAA. He reviews the literature on the accuracy of POCUS for AAA as well as demonstrates the limitations and the common pitfalls in this POCUS Cases video....

EM Quick Hits 26 LAST, Sodium Nitrite Poisoning, Post-intubation Care, Tetracaine for Corneal Abrasion, ST Segment in Occlusion MI, Coping with COVID

Anand Swaminathan on LAST prevention, recognition and management, Emily Austin on sodium nitrite suicide kit poisoning, methemoglobinemia and methylene blue, Hans & Erin Rosenberg on post-intubation analgesia and sedation, Salim Rezaie on short-term tetracaine for corneal abrasions new evidence, Jesse MacLaren on differentiating ST deviation in occlusion MI from other causes, Robert Maunder on a 3 step approach to coping and building resilience during the COVID pandemic...

POCUS Cases 9 Abdominal Free Fluid in Trauma

Rob Simard explains how to incorporate abdominal POCUS into your assessment of the trauma patient, he reviews the literature on accuracy of POCUS for assessment of abdominal free fluid, reviews the key POCUS steps and cautions us about interpretation of your findings in trauma patients who have sustained an injury to their abdomen...

Ep 152 The 7 Ts of Massive Hemorrhage Protocols

Dr. Jeannie Callum, Dr. Andrew Petrosoniak and Dr. Barbara Haas join Anton in answering the questions: How do you decide when to activate the MHP? How do you know when it is safe to terminate the MHP? What lab tests need to be done, how often, and how should the results be shared with the clinical team? Once the dust settles, what do we need to tell the patient and/or their family about the consequences of being massively transfused? What should be the lab resuscitation targets? Why is serum calcium important to draw in the ED for the patient who is exsanguinating? How do we mitigate the risk of hypothermia? What can hospitals do to mitigate blood wastage? If someone is on anti-platelets or anticoagulants what is the best strategy to ensure the docs in the ED know what to give and how much? Until the results of lab testing come back and hemorrhage pace is slowed, what ratio of plasma to RBCs should we target? What's better, 1:1:1 or 2:1:1? Should we ever consider using Recombinant Factor 7a? If the fibrinogen is low, what is the optimal product and threshold for replacement? When and how much TXA? Anyone you wouldn’t give it to? and many more...

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