EM Cases emergency medicine education podcast

EM Quick Hits 44 Fluids in Pancreatitis, Nasal Fractures, Delirium, DOSE VF, Intimate Partner Violence

In this EM Quick Hits podcast: Justin Morgenstern on fluids in pancreatitis, Leeor Sommer on nasal fractures, Christina Shenvi on delirium, Sheldon Cheskes and Rohit Mohindra on Dose VF, and Noor Khatib and Kari Sampsel on intimate partner violence...

Global EM 1: Practicing EM in Bangladesh – Build It and They Will Come

Dr. Navpreet Sahsi describes the challenges of building an Emergency Department in Bangladesh and how the experience has shaped his outlook on Emergency Medicine practice in North America on EM Cases' first Global EM blog...

Ep 176 Orthopedic X-rays Master Class – Pitfalls in Obtaining and Interpreting MSK X-rays

Do not let a negative X-ray rule the day! Like almost all medical tests X-rays are far from perfect and should be ordered and interpreted only in the context of a thorough history and physical exam. In this 2nd part of our 2-part series on orthopedic x-rays with Dr. Arun Sayal and Dr. Yatin Chadha we discuss the pitfalls of obtaining and interpreting orthopedic X-rays, when orthopedic X-ray decision tools lead us astray, how understanding the concept of central ray helps dictate how we should order X-rays and interpret them, how the ring structure concept of the forearm and lower leg can remind us where to look for a second injury, when we need 3 views vs 2 views, when extra views like the clenched fist view and weight bearing views are indicated, why we should always look at the lateral view first, the limitations of ultrasound and CT in long bone and joint injuries and more...

ECG Cases 37 ECG interpretation in electrolyte emergencies

While most of us have a clear algorithm in our minds for the management of life-threatening hyperkalemia, the same may not be said about the other life-threatening electrolyte abnormalities. In this ECG Cases blog Dr. Jesse MacLaren gives us an approach to potassium, calcium and magnesium abnormalities including risk factor assessment, ECG interpretation and management pearls...

Ep 175 Emergency Orthopedics Differential: SCARED OF Mnemonic – When X-rays Lie

In this main episode podcast, Dr. Arun Sayal creator of the CASTED course and Dr. Yatin Chadha a radiologist with a fellowship in MSK radiology, join Anton for Part 1 of 2 podcasts on Emergency Orthopedic Injuries. This episode focuses on a differential diagnosis of MSK injuries that are occult to X-ray with the help of the SCARED OF mnemonic. It ensures we pick up all the “can’t miss” diagnoses that can be easily overlooked when we do not integrate a pointed history and physical exam with the X-ray in front of us. Essentially, we discuss ‘when X-rays lie’ and offer up a variety of clinical pearls and pitfalls in assessing patients in the ED with MSK presentations…

EM Quick Hits 43 Pediatric Cannabis Poisoning, Esophageal Perforation, Brugada, Career Transitions in EM

On this month's EM Quick Hits podcast: Best of University of Toronto EM with Yaron Finkelstein on pediatric cannabis poisoning pitfalls, Brit Long on recognition and management of esophageal perforation, Jesse McLaren on 3 questions to diagnose Brugada Syndrome, Tahara Bhate on QI Corner, Constance Leblanc on maintaining wellness in career transitions from CAEP 2022...

ECG Cases 36 – PACER Mnemonic for Approach to Pacemaker Patients

In this month's ECG Cases blog Dr. McLaren explains the PACER mnemonic approach to patients with pacemakers: Pacemaker spike: is it appropriately presence/absent, is there pacemaker-mediated tachycardia (apply magnet) or is there failure to pace (apply magnet to stop sensing, cardio consult)? Aware (sensing): is it normal, is there oversensing (underpacing: apply magnet) or undersensing (treat reversible causes, cardio consult). Capture: if there are pacemaker spikes is there capture, or failure to capture (treat reversible causes, cardio consult). ECG 12 lead: are there signs of hyperkalemia (extra wide QRS, peaked T) or Occlusion MI (Modified Sgarbossa Criteria) that need immediate treatment. Rest of patient: is there a complication of pacemaker insertion related to the pocket (hematoma, infection), lead (pneumothorax, DVT), or heart (pericardial perforation), or is there an emergency unrelated to the pacemaker (eg dehydration, sepsis, GI bleed)...

Ep 174 Is Less More? Saving EM and Traumatic Pneumothorax – Highlights from CAEP 2022

Emergency Medicine has undergone many changes over the last couple of decades and especially during the COVID pandemic. Most of these changes have been very positive, but increasing volumes, staff shortages, aging populations, increasing breadth of responsibilities and better access to more imaging have made some of us question how we should define the scope of our practices. In this main episode podcast, highlights from CAEP 2022 conference, Anton discusses the article 'Saving EM: Is Less More?' with Dr. Paul Atkinson and Dr. Grant Innes and offer some solutions to this current state of affairs in EM. In another CAEP highlight, trauma team leader Dr. Mathieu Toulouse delivers the latest on management of traumatic pneumothorax. He answers such questions as: Do all patients with a traumatic pneumothorax require tube thoracostomy? How do CXR and CT differ in determining which patients require a chest tube? Do all patients receiving positive pressure ventilation require a chest tube for their traumatic pneumothorax? Does the presence of hemothorax necessitate placement of a chest tube? Are 14Fr pigtail catheters adequate for all traumatic pneumothoraces? and many more...

EM Quick Hits 42 – Subsegmental PE, Trauma Analgesia, Drowning, Polio, Head-up CPR

In this EM Quick Hits podcast: Salim Rezaie on venous thromboembolism recurrence in subsegmental pulmonary embolism, Andrew Petrosoniak on pain management in the polytrauma, Nour Khatib on a rural EM case on management of near-drowning patient, Sara Reid delivers a polio primer, Anand Swaminathan on head-up CPR...

ECG Cases 35 – ECG Approach to Takotsubo Syndrome

Takotsubo Syndrome is usually triggered by an emotional or physical stress leading to acute catecholaminergic myocardial stunning. The initial ST elevation phase of Takotsubo Syndrome mimics Occlusion MI, can not be distinguished by patient factors or POCUS findings, and requires immediate angiogram. The subsequent phase of Takotsubo Syndrome has T wave inversion in an apical distribution, which can mimic reperfusion, but often has very deep T wave inversions and a very long QT interval. Takotsubo Syndrome is a retrospective diagnosis of exclusion—with an angiogram ruling out occlusion, a ventriculogram showing apical ballooning, and a follow up echo showing recovery of LV function. Complications of Takotsubo Syndrome include LV failure, apical thrombus, and polymorphic VT from long QT. Jesse McLaren guides us through 10 ECGs to elucidate these important take home points...

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