Ep 147 HHS Recognition and ED Management

In this podcast, Part 2 of our diabetic emergencies series with Melanie Baimel, Bourke Tillmann and Leeor Sommer, we dive into the recognition and ED management of Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar State (HHS). We answer questions such as: how does one differentiate DKA from HHS clinically? How do patients with HHS become hyperglycemic, dry and altered? Why is finding and treating the cause or trigger of HHS so important in the ED? How does fluid management differ in HHS from DKA? and many more...

By |2020-10-27T12:29:00-04:00October 13th, 2020|Categories: EM Cases, Emergency Medicine, Episodes, Medical Specialty|Tags: , , , |0 Comments

Ep 146 DKA Recognition and ED Management

In this first part of our 2-part podcast on DKA and HHS, Drs Melanie Baimel, Bourke Tillman and Leeor Sommer discuss the importance of identifying the underlying cause or trigger in DKA patients, the pitfall of ruling out DKA in patients with normal pH or normal serum glucose, how to close the gap effectively, why stopping the insulin infusion is almost never indicated, how to avoid cardiac collapse when DKA patients require endotracheal intubation, the best alternatives to plastic in the trachea, why using a protocol improves patient outcomes, how to avoid the common complications of hypoglycemia and hypokalemia, and much more...

EM Quick Hits 17 Adrenal Crisis, Strep Throat, Posterior MI, DKA Just the Facts, Ovarian Torsion Imaging, HINTS Exam, Canadian CT Head Rule

Anand Swaminathan on recognition and ED management of adrenal crisis, Maria Ivankovic on indications for antibiotics in strep throat from EM Cases Course 2020, Jesse McLaren on recognition of posterior MI from ECG Cases, Justin Yan & Hans Rosenberg on just the facts of approach to DKA, Brit Long on ovarian torsion imaging myths, Walter Himmel on how to use the HINTS exam properly, and Ian Stiell on how to use Canadian CT head rules properly...

Best Case Ever 58 Euglycemic DKA

It's not only run of the mill DKA, starvation and alcoholic ketoacidosis that can cause a metabolic acidosis with elevated ketones. Euglycemic DKA can be caused by the newer diabetes medications sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors like Canagliflozin; and it's important to recognize this tricky diagnosis early and initiate treatment for DKA despite a normal serum glucose level...

Episode 63 – Pediatric DKA

Pediatric DKA was identified as one of key diagnoses that we need to get better at managing in a massive national needs assessment conducted by the fine folks at TREKK – Translating Emergency Knowledge for Kids – one of EM Cases’ partners who’s mission is to improve the care of children in non-pediatric emergency departments across the country. You might be wondering - why was DKA singled out in this needs assessment? It turns out that kids who present to the ED in DKA without a known history of diabetes, can sometimes be tricky to diagnose, as they often present with vague symptoms. When a child does have a known history of diabetes, and the diagnosis of DKA is obvious, the challenge turns to managing severe, life-threatening DKA, so that we avoid the many potential complications of the DKA itself as well as the complications of treatment - cerebral edema being the big bad one. The approach to these patients has evolved over the years, even since I started practicing, from bolusing insulin and super aggressive fluid resuscitation to more gentle fluid management and delayed insulin drips, as examples. There are subtleties and controversies in the management of DKA when it comes to fluid management, correcting serum potassium and acidosis, preventing cerebral edema, as well as airway management for the really sick kids. In this episode we‘ll be asking our guest pediatric emergency medicine experts Dr. Sarah Reid, who you may remember from her powerhouse performance on our recent episodes on pediatric fever and sepsis, and Dr. Sarah Curtis, not only a pediatric emergency physician, but a prominent pediatric emergency researcher in Canada, about the key historical and examination pearls to help pick up this sometimes elusive diagnosis, what the value of serum ketones are in the diagnosis of DKA, how to assess the severity of DKA to guide management, how to avoid the dreaded cerebral edema that all too often complicates DKA, how to best adjust fluids and insulin during treatment, which kids can go home, which kids can go to the floor and which kids need to be transferred to a Pediatric ICU.

Go to Top