pediatric emergency medicine

Ep 108 Pediatric Physical Abuse Recognition and Management

Just one case of missed pediatric physical abuse I consider a travesty. The sad state of affairs is that thousands of cases of paediatric physical abuse are missed on initial presentation to EDs across North America. And a small but significant minority of these children die. In fact, 20-30% of children who died from abuse and neglect had previously been evaluated by medical providers for abusive injuries that were not recognized as abuse. Every child that presents to the ED with a suspicious injury gives the treating physician an opportunity to intervene. We have to get better at identifying these kids when there’s still something we can do to protect them, before it’s too late. In this EM Cases main episode podcast on Pediatric Physical Abuse Recognition and Management Dr. Carmen Coombs and Dr. Alyson Holland discuss the 6 B's of child abuse, the TEN-4 FACE decision rule, the Pittsburgh Infant Brain Injury Score, disclosure tips, screening tests, reporting responsibilities and more...

BCE 67 Child Abuse – Sentinel Injuries

In anticipation of EM Cases Episode 107 on Pediatric Physical Abuse with Dr. Carmen Coombs and Dr. Alyson Holland, Dr. Coombs tells her Best Case Ever (actually worst case ever) that inspired her to pursue expertise in pediatric physical abuse...

BCE 66 CHD with Bronchiolitis: A Delicate Balance

When patients with known congenital heart disease present to the ED with common illnesses we need to consider how their physiology might alter our approach to those common illnesses. Max Ben-Yakov guides us through his Best Case Ever of a CHD patient who presents with bronchiolitis and gives us some tips on how best to approach these fragile patients in a crisis situation...

Rapid Reviews Videos on Pediatric DKA

In these short videos Eileen Cheung reviews the ED recognition, diagnosis and management of the often elusive Pediatric DKA including different management strategies for mild, moderate and severe DKA, use of sodium bicarbonate, management of cerebral edema, discharge criteria and more...

Episode 97 EM Literature Review 2016 from EMU & Whistler Conferences

Quick and insightful reviews of 17 important adult and pediatric emergency medicine studies from 2016: The PROCAMIO study for stable VT, platelets for head bleeds (PATCH), BP lowering in ICH (ATACH II), antibiotics for abscesses, work up of subarachnoid hemorrhage, dosing IV ketorolac, the PESIT trial, ketamine dosage for sedation in pediatrics, instructions after minor head injury, Salter-Harris I fractures of the lateral malleolus, interpreting oxygen saturation for disposition making in children with bronchiolitis, clinical pathways in pediatric asthma and sepsis and more...

Episode 95 Pediatric Trauma

Management of the pediatric trauma patient is challenging regardless of where you work. In this EM Cases episode, with the help of two leading pediatric trauma experts, Dr. Sue Beno from Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto and Dr. Faud Alnaji from Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario in Ottawa we answer such questions as: what are the most important physiologic and anatomic differences between children and adults that are key to managing the trauma patient? How much fluid should be given prior to blood products? What is the role of POCUS in abdominal trauma? Which patients require abdominal CT? How do you clear the pediatric c-spine? Are atropine and fentanyl recommended as pre-induction agents in the pediatric trauma patient? How can the BIG score help us prognosticate? Is tranexamic acid recommended in early pediatric trauma like it is in adults? Is the Pediatric Trauma Score helpful in deciding which patients should be transferred to a trauma center? and many more...

Episode 93 – PALS Guidelines

I remember when I started practicing emergency medicine a decade and a half ago it seemed that any kid who came to our ED in cardiac arrest died. I know, depressing thought. But, over the past 15 years, survival to discharge from pediatric cardiac arrest has markedly improved, at least for in-hospital arrests. This is probably mostly due to an emphasis on high-quality CPR and advances in post-resuscitation care; nonetheless the more comfortable, knowledgeable and prepared we are for the always scary critically ill pediatric patient, the more likely we will be able to resuscitate them successfully - which is always a huge save.

Best Case Ever 55 Pediatric Cerebral Herniation

In anticipation of the upcoming EM Cases main episode on Pediatric Polytrauma Dr. Suzanne Beno, Co-director of the Trauma Program at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, tells her Best Case Ever of a child who suffers a severe traumatic head injury with signs of raised intracranial pressure and cerebral herniation. She discusses the importance of being vigilant when presented with classic patterns of injury, the use of hypertonic saline, crisis resource management and shared decision making with consultants...

Best Case Ever 52 – Pediatric Hypothermia Cardiac Arrest

In anticipation of EM Cases Episode 90 on the Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) guidelines with the lead author Dr. Allan DeCaen and Dr. Anthony Crocco, Dr. DeCaen tells his Best Case Ever showing us the value of orchestrated team work and a great example of the saying, "they're not dead until they're warm and dead"...

Journal Jam 8 – Dilute Apple Juice for Pediatric Gastroenteritis

This is EM Cases Journal Jam podcast on a randomized control trial of dilute apple juice vs PediaLyte for mild pediatric gastroenteritis. While IV rehydration is required in cases of severe gastroenteritis (which we rarely see in North America) and oral rehydration with electrolyte maintenance solutions is still the mainstay in treating moderate gastroenteritis, could better-tasting, more cost-effective fluids such as diluted apple juice be just as effective as traditional electrolyte solutions in milder cases? Listen to Dr. Justin Morgenstern (@First10EM) interviewing Dr. Stephen Freedman, the world-renowned pediatric EM researcher who put ondansetron for pediatric gastroenteritis on the map and who was one of our guest experts on our main episode on Pediatric Gastroenteritis, Constipation and Bowel Obstruction, about this practice-changing paper. This is followed by a hilarious rant on the topic from Dr. Anthony Crocco ("Ranthony"), the Division head and medical director of pediatric EM at Hamilton Health Sciences.