ECG Cases 37 ECG interpretation in electrolyte emergencies

While most of us have a clear algorithm in our minds for the management of life-threatening hyperkalemia, the same may not be said about the other life-threatening electrolyte abnormalities. In this ECG Cases blog Dr. Jesse MacLaren gives us an approach to potassium, calcium and magnesium abnormalities including risk factor assessment, ECG interpretation and management pearls...

Rapid Reviews Videos on Oncologic Emergencies

The EM Cases Rapid Reviews Videos library is growing! You might have had trouble remembering all the details of Episode 33 Oncologic Emergencies from a few years back with Joel Yaphe and John Foote. But don't fret! In this short video Nick Clarridge reviews the ED recognition, diagnosis and management of the often elusive Oncologic Emergencies including Febrile Neutropenia, SVC syndrome, Tumor Lysis Syndrome, Hyperviscosity Syndrome, hypercalcemia and more...

Episode 33: Oncologic Emergencies

In this episode on Oncologic Emergencies Dr. John Foote (University of Toronto's CCFP(EM) residency program director) and Dr. Joel Yaphe (the director of the University of Toronto’s Annual Update in Emergency Medicine conference in Whistler), review 5 important presentations in the patient with cancer: fever, shortness of breath, altered mental status, back pain and acute renal failure; with specific attention to key cancer-related emergencies such as febrile neutropenia, hypercalcemia, superior vena cava syndrome, hyperviscosity syndrome and tumor lysis syndrome.

Best Case Ever 16: Oncologic Emergencies

As bonus to Episode 33 on oncologic emergencies, Dr. John Foote, the CCFP(EM) residency program director at the University of Toronto tells us about his Best Case Ever in which he missed an important cancer-related diagnosis. In the related episode with Dr. Foote and Dr. Joel Yaphe, we will review 5 common presentations in the patient with cancer: fever, shortness of breath, altered mental status, back pain and acute renal failure; with specific attention to key cancer-related emergencies such as febrile neutropenia, hypercalcemia, superior vena cava syndrome, hyperviscosity syndrome and tumor lysis syndrome.

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