Episode 56 The Stiell Sessions: Clinical Decision Rules and Risk Scales

There are hundreds of clinical decision rules and risk scales published in the medical literature, some more widely adopted than others. Ian Stiell, the father of clinical decision rules, shares with us his views and experiences gained from co-creating some of the most influential CDRs and risk scales to date. He explains the criteria for developing a CDR, the steps to developing a valid CDR, how best to apply CDRs and risk scales to clinical practice, and the hot-off the-press new Ottawa COPD Risk Score and Ottawa Heart Failure Risk Score for helping you with disposition decisions. It turns out that in Canada, we discharge about two thirds of the acute decompensated heart failure patients that we see in the ED, while the US almost all patients with decompensated heart failure are admitted to hospital. Dr. Stiell's new risk scores may help physicians in Canada make safer disposition decisions while help physicians in the US avoid unnecessary admissions.

Episode 17 Part 1: Emergency Stroke Controversies

Ep17 P1 StrokeDr. Walter Himmel, "the walking encyclopedia of Emergency Medicine" & Dr. Dan Selchen, the head of the stroke program at St. Micheal's Hospital in Toronto with 30+ years of experience as a stroke neurologist, update us on the literature regarding Emergency Stroke Controversies including the ABCD2 Score to predict Stroke after TIA, as well as the current thinking around the best carotid imaging for patients who have had a TIA. They then review the important findings of the key thrombolysis stroke trials & how we could incorporate these findings into our daily practice. Dr. Selchen reviews the key CT findings we should look for in stroke, & Dr. Himmel takes us through how to manage the dreaded complication of ICH post thrombolysis. This episode is super controversial - so please 'speak your mind' at the bottom of the page.

Episode 6: Transient Ischemic Attack

Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) can be difficult to diagnose. It's unclear who to work up. It's challenging if the patient is already taking blood thinners. Dr. Walter Himmel and Dr. Daniel Selchen discuss the key historical and physical examination maneuvers to determine whether patients with neurologic complaints have had a TIA or whether they have had a TIA mimic. They review the 3 best risk stratification rules including the ABCD2 Score to help us determine who needs to be admitted and who needs timely investigations to reduce vascular morbidity and mortality. The reasoning behind which patients require urgent carotid imaging, echocardiograms and advanced imaging such as CT Angiogram is explained, and the best medication choices are reviewed, as well as the indications for Clopidogrel, Aggrenox, Warfarin, Heparin and carotid endarterectomy in the managment of Transient Ischemic Attack. In the second part of the episode, a simple and practical approach to the patient with dizziness is presented, and a discussion on which patients with dizziness need urgent work-up and treatment for vertebrobasilar TIA.