Ophthalmology2020-11-25T20:46:12-05:00

Ophthalmology

Journal Jam 18 The Evidence for TXA – Should Tranexamic Acid Be Routine Therapy in the Bleeding Patient?

With the help of a special guest, EBM guru Dr. Ken Milne of the The SGEM, Anton and Justin look at all the various potential indications for TXA and review the available evidence. Should we be using TXA for epistaxis, postpartum hemorrhage, hyphema or hemoptysis? Is it a miracle drug that stops all bleeding? Or has it been drastically overhyped? Was CRASH-2 enough to be definitive, or does the classic EBM mantra of  "we need more studies" remain true?...

EM Quick Hits 24 Lateral Canthotomy, Cannabis Poisoning, Hyperthermia, Malignant Otitis Externa, BBB in Occlusion MI, Prone CPR

In this month's EM Quick Hits podcast: Anand Swaminathan on lateral canthotomy, Emily Austin on pediatric cannabis poisoning, Reuben Strayer on an approach to hyperthermia, Brit Long on diagnosis and management of malignant otitis externa, Jesse McLaren on ECG diagnosis of occlusion MI in patients with BBB and Peter Brindley on prone CPR...

EM Quick Hits 5 Ludwig’s Angina, Transient Monocular Vision Loss, D-dimer for PE Workup in Pregnancy, Pediatric Nasal Foreign Bodies, Trimethoprim Drug Interactions, Airway Management in Cardiac Arrest

In this EM Quick Hits Podcast: Ludwig's Angina Emergency Management - Approach, Airway, Imaging, Transient Monocular Vision Loss (TMVL), D-dimer in the Work-up of Pulmonary Embolism in Pregnancy, Management of Pediatric Nasal Foreign Bodies: Tips and Tricks, Sulfamethoxazole-Trimethoprim Drug Interactions and Airway Options in Cardiac Arrest - LMA for all?...

POCUS Cases 3 Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension and Ocular POCUS

In this POCUS Cases 3 - Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension & Ocular POCUS, Dr. Simard explains the limitations of CT head in the diagnosis of idiopathic intracranial hypertension, how to identify papilledema on ocular POCUS, how to measure Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter (ONSD) on POCUS and the limitations of ONSD on ocular POCUS.

Ep 107 Blunt Ocular Trauma Live from The EM Cases Course

In this live podcast on Blunt Ocular Trauma from The EM Cases Course 2018 with Anna MacDonald we discuss the most important diagnoses to consider, describe how physical exam in queen while CT can misguide you, explain a simple approach to orbital compartment syndrome with retrobulbar hematoma, give you tips on lateral canthotomy, how to pick up subtle hyphemas, why sickle cell patients are high risk, describe the key clinical clues to subtle globe rupture, the role of tranexamic acid in eye bleeds and much more...

Journal Jam 6 – Outpatient Topical Anesthetics for Corneal Abrasions

This is EM Cases Journal Jam Podcast 6 - Outpatient Topical Anesthetics for Corneal Abrasions. I’ve been told countless times by ophthalmologists and other colleagues NEVER to prescribe topical anesthetics for corneal abrasion patients, with the reason being largely theoretical - that tetracaine and the like will inhibit re-epithelialization and therefore delay epithelial healing as well as decrease corneal sensation, resulting in corneal ulcers. With prolonged use of outpatient topical anesthetics for corneal abrasions, corneal opacification could develop leading to decreased vision. Now this might be true for the tetracaine abuser who pours the stuff in their eye for weeks on end, but when we look at the literature for toxic effects of using topical anesthetics in the short term, there is no evidence for any clinically important detrimental outcomes. Should we ignore the dogma and use tetracaine anyway? Is there evidence that the use of topical anesthetics after corneal abrasions is safe and effective for pain control without adverse effects or delayed epithelial healing? To discuss the paper "The Safety of Topical Anesthetics in the Treatment of Corneal Abrasions: A Review" by Drs. Swaminathan, Otterness, Milne and Rezaie published in the Journal of Emergency Medicine in 2015, we have EM Cases’ Justin Morgenstern, a Toronto-based EM Doc, EBM enthusiast as well as the brains behind the First10EM blog and Salim Rezaie, Clinical Assistant Professor of EM and Internal Medicine at University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio as well as the Creator & Founder of the R.E.B.E.L. EM blog and REBELCast podcast. In this Journal Jam podcast, Dr. Morgenstern and Dr. Rezaie also discuss a simple approach to critically appraising a systematic review article, how to handle consultants who might not be aware of the literature and/or give you a hard time about your decisions and much more...

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