Episode 93 – PALS Guidelines

I remember when I started practicing emergency medicine a decade and a half ago it seemed that any kid who came to our ED in cardiac arrest died. I know, depressing thought. But, over the past 15 years, survival to discharge from pediatric cardiac arrest has markedly improved, at least for in-hospital arrests. This is probably mostly due to an emphasis on high-quality CPR and advances in post-resuscitation care; nonetheless the more comfortable, knowledgeable and prepared we are for the always scary critically ill pediatric patient, the more likely we will be able to resuscitate them successfully - which is always a huge save.

Best Case Ever 52 – Pediatric Hypothermia Cardiac Arrest

In anticipation of EM Cases Episode 90 on the Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) guidelines with the lead author Dr. Allan DeCaen and Dr. Anthony Crocco, Dr. DeCaen tells his Best Case Ever showing us the value of orchestrated team work and a great example of the saying, "they're not dead until they're warm and dead"...

CritCases 5 – Pediatric Drowning and Hypothermia

In this CritCases blog - a collaboration between STARS Air Ambulance Service, Mike Betzner and EM Cases, Dr. Michael Misch discusses the management controversies around a challenging pediatric drowning and hypothermia case, including the nuances of rewarming, oxygenation, CPR or no CPR, the role of ECMO, dosing of epinephrine and more...

Best Case Ever 20: CPR in Trauma

BEST CASE EVER 20: CPR in Trauma?!?! Closed Chest Compressions in Traumatic Arrest?!?! Is CPR ever successful in the trauma patient? Dr. Dave MacKinnon, Trauma Team Leader at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto, gives you his Best Case Ever in the cardiac arrest trauma patient. The literature is full of case series of zero survival in trauma patients requiring CPR. For example, this report in CJEM. Normally, we should not be thinking of CPR in traumatic arrests, but instead, ED thoracotomy as Scott Weingart of emcrit describes in his podast 36 - Traumatic Arrest. But just wait until you here Dave's Best Case Ever..........

Episode 12 Part 2: ACLS Guidelines – Atropine, Adenosine & Therapeutic Hypothermia

In Part 2 of this episode on ACLS Guidelines - Atropine, Adenosine & Therapeutic Hypothermia, Dr. Steven Brooks and Dr. Michael Feldman discuss the removal of Atropine from the PEA/Asystole algorithm, the indications and dangers of Adenosine in wide-complex tachycardias, pressors as a bridge to transvenous pacing in unstable bradycardias, and the key elements of post cardiac arrest care including therapeutic hypothermia and PCI. They answer questions such as: In which arrhythmias can Amiodarone cause more harm than good? Is there any role for transcutaneous pacing for asystole? When should Bicarb be given in the arrest situation? In what situations is Atropine contra-indicated or the dosage need to be adjusted? How has the widespread use of therapeutic hypothermia currently effected our ability to prognosticate post-arrest patients? What are the indications for PCI and thrombolysis in the cardiac arrest patient? Should we be using therapeutic hypothermia in the non-Vfib arrest patient? What is the best method for achieving the target temperature for the patient undergoing therapeutic hypothermia? and many more......

Episode 12 Part 1: ACLS Guidelines – What’s New & Controversial

In Part 1 of this episode on the latest ACLS Guidelines, Dr. Steven Brooks and Dr. Michael Feldman review and debate what's new and what's controversial in the the 2010 American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care. Within the frameworks of Cardiocerebral Rescusitation and the 3 phase model of rescucitation (electrical, circulatory and metabolic), they discuss the importance of high quality CPR, the de-emphasis on early ventilation and the utility of continuous quantitative waveform capnography. Dr. Brooks and Dr. Feldman answer questions such as: of all the therapeutic manoeuvres we do for the cardiac arrest patient, which ones have been shown to improve survival to hospital discharge? What is the evidence for chest compression machines? What is the utility of bedside ultrasound in the cardiac arrest patient? Why is cardiac arrest survival to discharge in Seattle the best in the world? Should we be performing 'hands-on defibrillation'? and many more.....

Best Case Ever 1 Is Thrombolysis Better Than PCI for STEMI?

Our first Best Case Ever is from Dr. Steven Brooks, a co-author of the 2010 AHA Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care. This Best Case Ever is a bonus to Episode 12 ACLS Guidelines - What's New & Controversial, in which we discuss the frameworks of Cardiocerebral Rescusitation and the 3 phase model of rescucitation (electrical, circulatory and metabolic), the importance of high quality CPR, the de-emphasis on early ventilation and the utility of continuous quantitative waveform capnography. Dr. Brooks and Dr. Michael Feldman answer questions such as: of all the therapeutic manoeuvres we do for the cardiac arrest patient, which ones have been shown to improve survival to hospital discharge? What is the evidence for chest compression machines? What is the utility of point of care ultrasound (POCUS) in the cardiac arrest patient? Why is cardiac arrest survival to discharge in Seattle the best in the world? Should we be performing 'hands-on defibrillation'? and many more..... [wpfilebase tag=file id=368 tpl=emc-play /] [wpfilebase tag=file id=369 tpl=emc-mp3 /]