Orthopaedics2020-11-25T20:53:33-05:00

Orthopaedics

EM Quick Hits 21 TXA in GI Bleed, Pediatric DKA, POCUS for Shoulder Dislocations, Lisfranc Injuries, Dexamethasone for COVID Pneumonia, Consultation Tips

Salim Rezaie on HALT-IT trial for TXA in unstable GI bleed, Sarah Reid on pediatric DKA update in fluid management and cerebral edema, Hans Rosenberg on POCUS in shoulder dislocations via CJEM, Arun Sayal on Lisfranc injury pearls and pitfalls, Justin Morgenstern on RECOVERY Trial for Dexamethasone in COVID pneumonia, Walter Himmel on getting what you need from consultants...

EM Quick Hits 18 Conservative Management Pneumothorax, Microdosing Buprenorphine, Practical Use of CRITOE, Canadian TIA Score, Pediatric Surviving Sepsis Guidelines, Safety of Peripheral Vasopressors

Justin Morgenstern on watchful waiting for large spontaneous pneumothoraces, Michelle Klaiman on mirco-dosing buprenorphine for opiate use disorder, Arun Sayal on the practical application of CRITOE in pediatric elbow fractures, Jeff Perry on The Canadian TIA Score, Sarah Reid on updated pediatric surviving sepsis guidelines, Salim Rezaie (Best of REBELEM) on safety of vasopressor administration through peripheral IVs...

Ep 136 Occult Shoulder Injuries and Proximal Humerus Fractures

Dr. Arun Sayal and Dr. Dale Dantzer answer questions such as: What should be included in the list of  key occult shoulder injuries that we should have in our back pockets when we are faced with a patient who has injured their shoulder and the x-ray appears normal? Which proximal humerus fractures are likely to require surgical management? Which shoulder injuries require a simple sling vs Velpeau sling vs collar and cuff vs sugar tong splint? When is an ultrasound of the shoulder indicated and how should they be interpreted? What is the best x-ray view to diagnose a sternoclavicular dislocation? What are the surgical indications for clavicle fractures? and many more...

Ep 135 Commonly Missed or Mismanaged Shoulder Injuries – Approach and Glenohumeral Dislocations

Dr. Arun Sayal and Dr. Dale Dantzer answer questions such as: How do we know we have adequate shoulder x-ray views? How can we best remember the differential diagnosis of an orthopedic extremity emergency with a normal x-ray? What is the quickest and best way to test neurologic status of patients with shoulder injuries? Why is axillary view of the shoulder so valuable? What is the biggest myth when it comes to the mechanism of injury for posterior glenohumeral shoulder dislocations? What physical exam maneuvers increase suspicion for posterior glenohumeral dislocation? What are the subtle findings on x-ray we should look for in patients with suspected posterior glenohumeral dislocation? What is the preferred first line reduction technique for posterior shoulder dislocation? What are the most common and consequential pitfalls in the management of anterior shoulder dislocations? and many more...

EM Quick Hits 9 Burn Blister Debridement, ECG Cases, Compartment Syndrome, Pediatric Asthma, Spinal Trauma, Motivational Interviewing P2

Justin Morgenstern on the lack of evidence for burn debridement, Jesse MacLaren on ECG Cases - missed ischemia and pitfalls of "normal" computer ECG interpretations, Arun Sayal on clinical diagnosis pitfalls of compartment syndrome, Sarah Reid on pediatric asthma pitfalls and myths, Andrew Petrosoniak on T-spine and L-spine fracture work-up, Michelle Klaiman & Taryn Lloyd on motivational interviewing part 2...

Ep 126 EM Drugs That Work and Drugs That Don’t – Part 1: Analgesics

In this podcast we discuss the key concepts in assessing drug efficacy trials, and provide you with a bottom line recommendation for the use of gabapentinoids, NSAIDs and acetaminophen for low back pain and radicular symptoms, topical NSAIDs and cyclobenzaprine for sprains and strains, caffeine as an adjunct analgesic, why we should never prescribe tramadol, dexamethasone for pharyngitis, calcium channel blockers for hemorrhoids and anal fissures, buscopan for abdominal pain and renal colic and why morphine might be a better analgesic choice than hydromorphone...

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